Pet Project Mallorca

Every week we aim to re home an animal currently being cared for by an animal refuge on the island. The project is supported by professional photographers from around the island, the PR firm Phoenix Media, and The Majorca Daily Bulletin.

Tag: looking after kittens

Animal Parties!

by petprojectmallorca

This week’s Pet Project is a quick round up of fundraising events which are coming up in the next weeks in aid of rescued animals.

100% Animal On Sunday 27th October there will be the “100% Animal” festival. This will feature various organisations, refuges, charities, and ecological groups. There will be a little market for organisations to sell gifts, live music, face painting, presentations, animal training demonstrations, a charity raffle, tennis, a Coolest Mongrel competition and the Coolest Ferret competition, and a dog beauty parade featuring dogs which need adopting. The event is happening at the Agroturismo Ca Na Susi which is on Carretera de Valldemossa at km 10.9 (100 metres from S’Esgleieta) and will run from 10am to 7pm on that Sunday. Any enquiries can be made to festivalanimal@outlook.es

On Thursday 31st October, Halloween, you can join a part at Willies Bar in Magaluf. This bar is run byWillies Bar Nicky Morgan who has featured in these pages in the past. Nicky is a dedicated kitten carer, and has hand reared many, many little balls of fur!  This fundraiser will be in aid of “Cat, Kitten and Furry Friends” which are two online groups of animal lovers who respond to animals in distress and give of their own time freely, generously and willingly. The idea came after a colleague and friend of Nicky’s, Elaine Gill, found a dying cat in the streets of Santa Ponsa and they realised that they needed to have some money available for emergency vet bills. Nicky and Elaine along with another passionate animal Nicky Morganover Renee Nijs have got together to organise what sounds like a super party. There will be a free buffet and it is free entrance to the party. There will be live music from JP Bradshaw and karaoke as well, and there will be a charity raffle.  You can get more information by calling 971 130 503. Willie’s Bar is on Avenida Notario Alemany No 9, Magaluf.

Every week Pet Project aims to help to rehome an animal or to help and support a refuge or animal shelter here on the island. Pet Project is run by the PR firm Phoenix Media and is supported by the Majorca Daily Bulletin and some of the island’s best professional and amateur photographers. For more information or to get involved visit www.petprojectmallorca.com or like Pet Project on Facebook.

Advertisements

Bingo! Just another street cat (not).

by petprojectmallorca

By Vicki McLeod

Bingo2 It was a year ago, give or take a week, when I was looking through the Mallorca animal Facebook groups to see if there was any news I could use for the Pet Project column when my eye fell upon this lively looking kitten. Her alert expression made me laugh out loud, and somewhere inside me I knew that I was going to adopt her. This was in direct opposition to the whole point of Pet Project: I had started the project earlier in the year as my response to the growing problem of abandoned animals in Majorca. I simply couldn’t adopt them all but I wanted to help, I wanted to find a way to get those animals to people who would love them and look after them. I couldn’t bear the sight of yet another dejected dog dumped at the gates of Son Reus for whatever reason, and I knew that if you had better photos of the animals that they were more likely to be adopted. The first ever Pet Project column was inspired by Cati Salvo who is a very talented amateur photographer (thanks should also go to the amazing professional photographers that have given their time over the past year including: Karl Grant, Oliver Neilson, and Samantha Hemsley, and I am very happy to say that this list is soon to be joined by more, thank you). Cati had taken a wonderful photo of a cat that needed a home, and although I couldn’t offer that animal a home at the time, I was inspired to help him. So I asked the Majorca Daily Bulletin for their support, happily they agreed and they have patiently given Pet Project a space in their newspaper every Friday for almost 18 months now; thank you to Jason, Humphrey, Christina and the rest of the MDB team. Between us so far we have homed several dogs and cats, and have given publicity and helped with fundraising for a variety of causes around the island as well.

I did adopt the kitten. I rang up the person who had posted the photo in Facebook and arranged to meet them on a road in Palma. I literally took delivery of this little scrap of fur outside of a Bingo hall. And that is how she got her name. Bingo. A yearBingo on and she delights me every day with her quirky personality. Even though she was a feral cat born in the house of man who had Diogenes syndrome (a hoarder to you and I) she settled right in to our house and got on very well with our other pets. The moral of this story? Sometimes you have to follow your heart. If you see an animal in need and you can help, then please do.

Coming up this weekend on Saturday July 20th there is a fundraising party to help at the CEIP Miquel Duran i Saurina (check with the organisers for the full address). It is to help fill the coffers for a sterilisation project for stray and feral street cats (just like my beloved Bingo who started off as just another street cat). The sterilisation project is very important as it is absolutely the best way to prevent disease and over population of cats. Adult tickets are 10€ and include a vegetarian buffet and children’s tickets (under 12 years) are 5€. The price includes dinner, a drink and dessert. There will be live music and entertainment for children as well, including face painting  by the lovely Marion Donaque. If you can’t make it to the event then please do think of making a donation to the cause. You can get more information about the party at www.facebook.com/talldorella.mallorca.

If you want to support Pet Project as it grows then please join us on Twitter at @petprojectmallo, on Facebook (search Pet Project Mallorca) or on the web at www.petprojectmallorca.com. Please keep reading the column every week in the MDB and show your friends!

It’s kitten time!

by petprojectmallorca

untitled-5106

Bottle feeding is a round the clock task.

kittens

It is important to isolate the rescued cats from any of your other pets.

 

It’s that time of year when animal rescue centres become inundated with abandoned kittens. If you want to help by fostering or hand rearing any kittens or if you find some or a mother cat about to give birth then read on for some advice from a very experienced “Cat Lady” Cati Salva.

“If you see kittens inside a box next to a rubbish bin it’s clear that they have been abandoned. It is not so clear if you find them somewhere odd (a plant pot, or in the middle of the street). In this case I advise people to do this:

1) Don’t ever touch them. It could happen that the mum is moving them from one place to another and if they catch your scent some mother cats will reject their babies.

2) Watch from a distance. Stay around somewhere where you can see the kittens but are not scaring the mum in case she comes back for her kittens.

3) If you don’t see any adult cat around in about 30 minutes to an hour (depending on how busy the area is) then yes, you may go ahead and take them because the mum is most likely not coming back for them. Something might have happened or not, but a baby cat can’t stay for long without the warmth of its mother.

“If you take them home you have to keep them separate from your other cats if you happen to have any. This is extremely important. Even if they seem healthy they could have a stomach bug or some other ailments and you need to protect both your own animals and the babies.

“Things vary from caring for a four month old kitten or a new born. The older kittens will have wide open eyes, sharp teeth and be quite mobile creatures. They will most likely be eating by themselves. You can soak some dry cat biscuits in water and see if they will eat. Younger kittens need to be bottle fed. Their eyes will be open at 15 days of age but they won’t be able to move around very easily. If you are unsure as to the age of the kittens then take a visit to a vet to make sure.

“If you are bottle feeding kittens the most important thing is to keep them warm. Until they are a bit older they can’t control their body temperature so they have to have blankets. I usually use one of those electrical pillows on a low setting to keep them warm enough (be sure you’re not burning them of course!). Make sure the electrical cable is tucked away and put a cloth on top of the device to avoid warm plastic on their skin.

“Another very important thing is: no, cats can’t drink cows’ milk! Not even lactose free cows’ milk. They have to have special cat milk which can be bought at the vets and most pet shops. There are a lot of brands and it doesn’t matter which one you chose as long as you don’t change it once you have started. Baby stomachs are quite delicate and sudden feeding changes may cause diarrhoea and subsequent dehydration.

“To feed them, prepare the formula as indicated and use a baby cat bottle. Some cats don’t latch on to bottles at first, so you have to be persistent and patient. Sometimes they can’t get the milk out, so you may squeeze the tip a bit (or make the hole slightly bigger) so they get to taste one or two drops and get motivated to suck themselves. Some other cats don’t like bottles and people feed them with small (needle free) syringes, but this is dangerous as you could accidentally place milk into their lungs. They should never be placed belly up like human babies It is ideal if they can eat on their paws in a hard surface (you can put a blanket in between). Just think about how the kittens would feed from their mums: that’s the ideal position. After their meal the babies need to be stimulated to urinate and defecate.  If they were with mum then she would usually lick their bottoms. You don’t have to do that! Instead you could use a piece of wet, mildly warm gauze and wipe the area.

“You should expect them to be hungry every 2 to 3 hours at first. Yes, it’s just like having a human baby and can be super tiring work. You can try to make the “night feeds” a bit more substantial by making a slightly thicker formula, but don’t overdo it. The kittens may need bottle feeding up until around six weeks of age. Sometimes they eat at four weeks, but some others don’t. Some vets advise to give the kittens chamomile between feeds and others tell you to prepare the formula with chamomile instead of water. That is completely up to you.

Nicky Morgan

Nicky Morgan with one of her rescued cats

“If you can’t be in charge of the feedings because you work, ask your local shelter if they know of anyone that could. They can’t take them into shelters because most of them are not open 24 hours a day, but sometimes they know volunteers that can take them home. You can ask at your local vet too, or even on Facebook groups like “Cat and kitten…” and “Furry friends…” Or get in touch with Nicky Morgan, pictured at The Kitten House on Facebook. Or get in touch with Pet Project either via the Majorca Daily Bulletin or online at http://www.petprojectmallorca.com Every week Pet Project tries to help or rehome a homeless animal in Majorca. Pet Project is supported by the Majorca Daily Bulletin, the PR business Phoenix Media Mallorca and several professional and amateur photographers around the island. You can get in touch with Pet Project at http://www.petprojectmallorca.com.